SOLD - A Charles I Antique English Silver Tankard

SOLD - A Charles I Antique English Silver Tankard

London, 1626 by RB

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Description

The Frewen Tankard: <br />
A very rare Charles I tankard, in superb condition. The form, known as a "hoop" tankard, was extremely common in wood, and was revived and widely produced in silver in the late 18th century, but we are aware of no other surviving 17th century examples in silver.<br /><br />

The arms are those of Frewen for the Reverend Accepted Frewen (1588-1664), later Archbisop of York.<br /><br />

The inscription, "Diluculo bibere saluberimum est," translates roughly as "the early drink is the healthiest" or, if you like Sheryl Crow, "I like a good beer buzz early in the morning."<br /><br />

Provenance:<br />
The Reverend Accepted Frewen, later Archbisop of York (1588-1664), probably made on his appointment as President of Magdalen College, Oxford<br />
Anonymous sale; Sotheby's, Monaco, 1 December 1975, lot 334<br />
Alastair Dickenson, London, 1993<br /><br />

Literature<br />
T. Schroder, English Silver Before the Civil War, The David Little Collection, Cambridge, 2015, pp. 52, 53, 107, 154, cat. no. 24.<br /><br />

The eldest son of the Puritan clergyman Reverend John Frewen, rector of Northam in Sussex, Accepted had numerous brothers, including the equally unusually named Thankfull, who also entered the church. Accepted was educated at Magdalen College, Oxford where he became a B.A. in 1606 and M.A. in 1612. He was ordained and made a fellow of the college that same year.<br /><br />

In 1617 he was given a leave of absence from the university to act as chaplain to Sir John Digby (1580-1653), ambassador to Spain. There he befriended Prince Charles, later King Charles I, during his visit, by warning him of attempts to convert him to Catholicism. Charles appointed Frewen as one of his personal chaplains following his accession to the throne. Frewen was unanimously elected president of Magdalen College, Oxford in 1626 and it is possible he was given this tankard on his appointment. He was appointed Vice Chancellor of the university in 1628 and 1629.<br /><br />

In 1642 Frewen helped arrange a loan of £500 to the beleaguered king, which led to an accusation of treason against parliament and an order for his arrest. He went into hiding and survived, and his loyalty was rewarded by the gift of a bishopric. He was made Bishop of Coventry and Lichfield in 1643. Turmoil in the country meant he was not enthroned until the following year, and because of his closeness with the King, by 1652 his position and estates were forfeit. He evaded capture and went into hiding France during the Interregnum.<br /><br />

On the return of the King in 1660 he was made Archbishop of York. He benefited greatly from the new leases issued to the tenants of the bishopric and he used large sums to restore Lichfield Cathedral and his episcopal seat Bishopthorpe near York. He died a very wealthy man, leaving his brother Stephen, Master of the Skinners Company, a fortune of almost £30,000. He also left £500 to Magdalen College 'my mother that gave me my breeding'.  A large monument was raised in his memory beneath the east window of York Minster.

Dimensions

Size Height: 5.75 in.
Weight 18 oz. 10 dwt.
Stock No V9906

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